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Buy Your Own Cable Box And Save
Watching TV in recent years has been greatly enhanced by features provided by cable operators high definition programming, video on demand and a ever growing menu of channels are features that most TV viewers love but one thing that most cable subscribers hate are cable box rental fees. The easiest way to get away from the expensive sting of cable box rental fee is to buy your own cable box(es).
Is It Possible To Unbundle And Save Money
Due to circumstances from tough economic times in recent years or by choice, people are looking at ways to spend less home phone, cable or satellite TV and Internet service.  Getting one or more of these services through alternative means can provide cost savings greater than buying the bundle from a cable TV or telephone company.

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Solving Common WiFi Woes
In just the past decade WiFi has become the standard connection to the Internet for many of the computers and other Internet enabled devices in most households and offices. The days of running and occasionally tripping over Ethernet cables are long in the past. From time to time WiFi breakdowns can send peoples' computers, tablets, and smartphones from networking to not working. Many problems that can cause WiFi networks to slow down or lose connection can be easily remedied.

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How To Put Your Smartphone On A Data Diet

One of todays' most popular high tech gadgets are smartphones. With millions sold every year, owners by the millions have learned the hard and a very expensive lesson about what happens when more data is used than what a data plan allows. There are settings that can adjusted to help reduce how much data a smartphone devours that will help save data and money.

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The Basics Of Long Term Evolution (LTE)

When it seems that cell phone and mobile computing technologies are merging at amazing pace. It seemed that once most people got used to texting on their cell phones, those phones gave way to smartphones and tasks that needed to be done on a computer could now be done on an iPhone, Blackberry or Android device. The next change that in mobile computing and communications will be similar to the change from analog to digital cellular networks that did away with the days of talking into a brick with an antenna attached inthe late 1990's. The GSM and CDMA networks we use today are set to give way to a new standard technology to power the cellular phones and networks in the next few years.   Long Term Evolution (LTE) is the technology that is set to become the standard for fourth generation wireless networks within the next few years. 

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Sony MZ-NF610 MiniDisc Player

In my search for a portable music player with the features that I wanted, I was coming up short of getting what I wanted so I had to take a sort of leap backwards. I went onto e-bay and got a portable minidisk player/recorder. I wanted an AM/FM radio so that I could listen to my favorite news/talk station while on the bus ride to work and during lunch break I could listen to my tunes from my computer. I ended up getting a Sony Net MD Walkman MZ-NF 610. Net MD is Sony’s method of taking audio files from computers and loading them onto MiniDiscs.

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Marc AndreessenMarc Andreessen
Inventor of Of the Modern Web Browser

Way back in 1992 when anybody but hard core geeks knew what going even meant, Marc Andreessen started to to the Internet what Graphical User Interface did for computer operating systems.  Up to that point information on the Internet was shrouded in arcane Unix commands and everything was text.  Andreessen was developing Mosaic at the Nation Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois.  The World Wide Web was just three years old at the time.  There were pages that were hyperlinked together but it was just text.  There wasn't even anything even called a web browser, in order to go to a web page it required telnetting into web server.  Even following links wasn't a matter of pointing and clicking.  To go to another page the number of the hyperlink had to be keyed into the computer and pressing the enter key. 

In early 1994, Andreessen's Mosaic changed all that.  Links became clickable and pictures became a permanent fixtures on web pages.  By making the web easy to use Mosaic helped fuel the Internet revolution of the mid 1990's.  By late 1994 Andreessen was recruited by financier Jim Clark to turn Mosaic into a new company.  In 1995 the newly formed Netscape Communications released the Navigator browser which was based on Mosaic.  Meanwhile Microsoft hired many of Andreessen's cohorts from NCSA to develop Internet Explorer.  By late 1996 Internet Explorer had finally become a viable competitor to Netscape Navigator.  The Browser Wars would last another couple of years with Internet Explorer winning due mostly to being bundled with Windows 98.  Internet Explorer would then have a market share of over 95 percent until Mozilla Firefox was based on programming code from Netscape would reclaim 15 percent market share from Internet Explorer.

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